CDE_5378 copyJames Patrick Stuart was born in Hollywood, California on June 16th, 1968 to British immigrants Chad and Jill Stuart. As his father was half of 60’s pop duo, Chad and Jeremy, James spent much of his childhood in Los Angeles recording studios, as well as under the dinner table while his parents dined with industry moguls and rock stars like George Harrison, Frank Zappa, and Crosby, Stills and Nash. But among the most influential on James, was a young Phil Hartman who, at the time, was but the younger brother of Chad and Jeremy manager, John Hartman.

One night in 1978, Chad and a 9 year old James attended a performance of the fledgling Los Angeles Improv group, The Groundlings. Hartman was in the cast, along with Groundling pioneers, Paul Reubens, Edie McClurg, Cassandra Peterson, Kip King and Tom Maxwell. That night, by his own estimation, Stuart’s destiny would be altered.

With dreams of becoming an actor, young Stuart auditioned for and was cast as Peter Cratchit in a small, North Hollywood production of “A Christmas Carol.” Spotted in the show by a talent agent, James shortly was starring as Lorne Greene’s starchild consultant, Dr. Zee on ABC’s “Galactica 1980.”

The sci-fi series was short lived and, after its cancellation, his childhood would temporarily revert to normal when, in 1982, Chad moved the family to he small ocean-front community of Laguna Beach, California where James would attend High School. James discovered the local Moulten Playhouse and its youth acting program where he would meet his first acting coach and mentor, Louise Rodecker.

After High School, Stuart would spend two years in San Francisco State University‘s drama department before dropping out in 1988 to study at Hollywood’s esteemed Stella Adler’s Conservatory of Acting under Arthur Mendoza and Joanne Linville and along side the likes of Benicio Del Toro, Mark Ruffalo and Michael Richards. In 1990 Stuart made a brief appearance in “Pretty Woman” as a bellhop and was quickly hired by the New York Soap Opera, “All My Children” as dark horse Will Cortlandt.

After leaving the soap in 1992 an Emmy award nominee, Stuart was quickly cast by director Ron Maxwell in the civil war epic, “Gettysburg“ where he played Col. Porter Alexander, the chief of Southern Artillery. Along side Martin Sheen and Tom Berenger, he commanded dozens of authentic, civil war howitzers firing over the heads of 20,000 extras in the sweeping reenactment of “Pickett’s Charge” on the actual field where the battle was fought 130 years earlier.

The film finished, he left New York and returned to Hollywood where he would be cast in the Garry Marshall directed “Exit to Eden” with Rosie O’Donnell and Dan Ackroyd. Shortly after that, James was offer the life changing role of Brett, Elaine’s egocentric, furniture designing boyfriend with a soft spot for the song “Desperado” in a popular episode of “Seinfeld.” Stuart next appeared as Guy (pronounced Gee), a French Ski instructor with the hots for Niles on a critically acclaimed episode of “Frasier.” Now firmly on network radar, before the end of the year, Stuart found himself a series regular on two separate sitcoms for two separate networks at the same time; NBC’s “Encore, Encore” starring Nathan Lane, and CBS’s “The Simple Life” with Judith Light.

During the hiatus, Stuart returned to New York for the off-Broadway play, “Wonderland” at New York’s American Place Theatre directed by the legendary Wynn Handman. The play was a success critically and ran through the summer of 1999. After closing and before returning to Los Angeles, James made a guest star appearance on the New York sit com (and then Michael J. Fox starring) “Spin City.” During a break in rehearsals, James and long time sweetheart, Jocelyn Stilwell, drove up to Martha’s Vineyard where, on bended knee, he asked for her hand in marriage.

2001 began with James joining the Emmy nominated and ground breaking FOX sitcom “Andy Richter Controls the Universe” as the office heartthrob, Keith. Produced by Victor Fresco (Mad about You) and directed by Andy Ackerman (Seinfeld), the show was loved by FOX, and universally adored by critics.

During the mid to late 2000’s, Stuart continued to enjoy an extremely prolific television career joining the casts of several funny network comedy pilots with Steve Carell, Janine Garaffallo, Jennifer Love-Hewitt, Chris Kattan and Heather Graham. From 2003 to 2008 he also maintained recurring roles on popular network hits like “CSI,” “The Closer,” “Still Standing” and “90210.”

From 2008 through 2010, James would be cast in the features “Imagine That” with Eddie Murphy, “Something Wicked” with the late Brittany Murphy, and “It’s Complicated” opposite Meryl Streep.

Stuart also, less overtly, maintains a successful voice over career. Since 2008, he has voiced the role of Private on Nickelodeon’s wildly popular “Penguins of Madagascar.” He can also be heard currently in the cast’s of Nick’s “Wynx Club” and the upcoming “Monsters Vs. Aliens.”

In 2011, James joined the cast of  CW’s “Supernatural” as big baddie, Dick Roman.

James lives in Los Angeles with his Wife, Jocelyn, and their two sons, Graham and Colin.

James Patrick Stuart was born in Hollywood, California on June 16th, 1968 to British immigrants Chad and Jill Stuart. As his father was half of 60’s pop duo, Chad and Jeremy, James spent much of his childhood in Los Angeles recording studios, as well as at the dinner table while his parents dined with industry moguls and rock stars such as George Harrison and David Crosby. But among the most influential on James, was a young Phil Hartman who, at the time, was but the younger brother of Chad and Jeremy manager, John Hartman. Phil played the role of “mad uncle” to James while dazzling all with his limitless imagination.
One time, while experimenting with the “stop-frame” capabilities of Chad’s 8mm movie camera, Phil produced an animated film in which a toy Superman butchered a village of James’ Fisher-Price Little People, using an entire bottle of Heinz ketchup for gruesome effect.
One night in 1978, Chad and a 9 year old James attended a performance of the fledgling Los Angeles Improv group, The Groundlings. Hartman was in the cast, along with Groundling pioneers, Paul Reubens, Edie McClurg, Cassandra Peterson, Kip King and Tom Maxwell. That night, by his own estimation, Stuart’s destiny would be altered.   With dreams of becoming an actor, the young Stuart would spend his out of school days at the Universal Studios Tour in Hollywood, and would often talk his mother and father to chaperoning him to night time tapings of sitcoms like “Happy Days” and “Mork and Mindy.”   Soon Stuart was cast as Young Scrooge in “A Christmas Carol” at North Hollywood’s small Theatre Exchange. Spotted in the show by a talent agent, James shortly was starring as Lorne Greene’s starchild consultant, Dr. Zee on ABC’s “Galactica 1980,” which, poetically, filmed on many of the Universal Studios soundstages he’d been driven by in the previous months as a wide eyed tourist.  The sci-fi series was short lived and, after its cancellation, his childhood would temporarily revert to normal when in 1982, Chad married his second wife and took up residence in the small Orange County community of Laguna Beach where James would ultimately finish High School. But the acting bug had bitten him and, at 14, James discovered the local Moulten Playhouse and its youth acting program where he would meet his first acting coach and mentor, Louise Rodecker.  After High School, Stuart would spend two years in San Francisco State University‘s drama department before dropping out in 1988 when the allure of Hollywood became too powerful.  From 1988 to 1990, Stuart divided his time between waiting tables at the infamous Vitello’s Restaurant in Studio City, (where Robert Blake’s wife eventually met her end) and studying at Hollywood’s esteemed Stella Adler’s Conservatory of Acting under Arthur Mendoza and Joanne Linville and along side the likes of Benicio Del Toro, Mark Ruffalo and Michael Richards. In 1990 Stuart made a brief appearance in “Pretty Woman” as a bellhop and was quickly hired by the New York Soap Opera, “All My Children” as dark horse Will Cortlandt.   After leaving the soap in 1992 an Emmy award nominee, Stuart was quickly cast by director Ron Maxwell in the civil war epic, “Gettysburg“ where he played Col. Porter Alexander, the chief of Southern Artillery. Along side Martin Sheen and Tom Berenger, he commanded dozens of authentic, civil war howitzers firing over the heads of 20,000 extras in the sweeping reenactment of “Pickett’s Charge” on the actual field where the battle was fought 130 years earlier.   The film finished, he left New York and returned to Hollywood where he would be cast in the Garry Marshall directed “Exit to Eden” with Rosie O’Donnell and Dan Ackroyd. The movie, in which Stuart played a dominant trainer on an island of S&M, and based loosely on the book by Anne Rice, was a critical and financial flop. Stuart committed his next film would be gritty and hopefully independently produced.  The next year James got his wish when cast by director Richard Zelniker in the dark, independent psycho-drama, “Fix.” Starring opposite Burr Steers (“Igby Goes Down”), Stuart plays David, one of two brothers coming to terms with the long and simmering repercussions of childhood molestation.   In 1994, through fellow All My Children alumnus Liz Vassey, Stuart was introduced to the sitcom when he guest starred as Vassey’s boyfriend on her UPN comedy, “Pig Sty.” Instantly smitten with the medium, Stuart would seek the comedic training of the earlier mentioned Groundling Improv / sketch comedy troupe, where he would study with such heavies as Michael Hitchcock, Karen Maruyama & Mindy Sterling. Two years of training would prove fruitful when, in 1997, James was cast as Elaine’s egocentric, furniture designing boyfriend with a soft spot for the song “Desperado” in a popular episode of “Seinfeld.”  In 1998 Stuart appeared as Guy (pronounced Gee), a French Ski instructor with the hots for Niles on a critically acclaimed episode of “Frasier.” Now firmly on network radar, before the end of the year, Stuart found himself a series regular on two separate sitcoms for two separate networks at the same time; NBC’s “Encore, Encore” starring Nathan Lane, and CBS’s “The Simple Life” with Judith Light.  Sadly, neither show was a hit, and while waiting for the shows’ official cancellations, Stuart was offered the role of Dennis in the off-Broadway play, “Wonderland” at New York’s American Place Theatre directed by the legendary Wynn Handman. The play was a success critically and ran through the summer of 1999. After closing and before returning to Los Angeles, James made a guest star appearance on the New York sit com (and then Michael J. Fox starring) “Spin City.” During a break in rehearsals, James and long time sweetheart, Jocelyn Stilwell, drove up to Martha’s Vineyard where, on bended knee, he asked for her hand in marriage.  The following year, 2000, James and Jocelyn were married in a tiny Presbyterian church in Mendocino, California. Ironically, Stuart had to pass on a 3 episode arc on NBC’s “The West Wing” as the shooting schedule conflicted with the couple’s honeymoon.
2001 began with James joining the Emmy nominated and ground breaking FOX sitcom “Andy Richter Controls the Universe” as the office heartthrob, Keith. Produced by Victor Fresco (Mad about You) and directed by Andy Ackerman (Seinfeld), the show was loved by FOX, and universally adored by critics. However, the show never found an audience and was cancelled after only 19 episodes.  During the most recent years, Stuart has continued to enjoy a prolific television career. Recurring on “CSI” (as public defender Adam Mathews) since 2003, he has also be seen in the casts of several funny yet ill-fated network comedy pilots starring the likes of Steve Carell, Janine Garaffallo, Jennifer Love-Hewitt, Chris Kattan and Heather Graham.   Stuart also, less overtly, maintains a successful voice over career. A path taken while following in the footsteps of his late mentor, Phil Hartman.  James lives in Los Angeles with his Wife, Jocelyn, and their two sons, Graham and Colin.

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